The names they carry: The continued efforts of Yupik elders to pass down knowledge

When Yup’ik people from southwest Alaska travel on their ancestral lands and waters, they navigate using traditional place names. These geographical locations of camps or settlements, rivers, ponds, sloughs, even rocks and sandbars convey historical tales about ancestors or battles, or knowledge of harvesting areas and sacred places. Names such as Niugtayagaq, meaning small place of rustling…
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Found in translation

As part of the ELOKA mission of ensuring data sovereignty for Arctic residents, ELOKA helped create online atlases for two groups of Indigenous people: the Yup’ik in Alaska and the Evenki in Siberia, Russia. These atlases use an interactive platform to upload, document, and share the knowledge, places names, and culture of these communities. Recently these atlases have been translated from…
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Advancing Indigenous data sovereignty

In September 2019, three international efforts were launched to advance Indigenous Peoples’ rights and interests in their data: The Oñati Indigenous Data Sovereignty Communique, the Establishment of the Global Indigenous Data Alliance (GIDA), and the CARE Principles of Indigenous Data Governance. Building on the rights frameworks recognized in the UN Declaration on Indigenous Peoples, these…
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Bering witness: Alaskan Elders give voice to the NOAA Arctic Report Card

Thousands of short-tailed shearwaters, Australian migratory birds, washed up dead on the beaches off of Bristol Bay, Alaska, in late June 2019. By mid-August, the bird die-off stretched north to the Bering and Chukchi Seas.
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Those who work with weather: Inuit and visiting scientists collaborate for better weather information

Long before the introduction of weather service forecasts, Inuit read the Arctic sky and environment to predict the weather.
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Changes for ELOKA team members: McCann, McNeave, and Pulsifer

The ELOKA team stands together for a group photo in May 2019. Left to right: Peter Pulsifer, Betsy Sheffield, Heidi McCann, Noor Johnson, and Matt Druckenmiller. Not pictured: Chris McNeave, Hannah Wilcox, Julia Collins, Agnieszka Gautier, Brendan Billingsley, and Shari Fox
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Yup’ik youth add Indigenous Knowledge to online atlas

Calista Education and Culture (CEC) interns from Nunapitchuk, Alaska, contribute their time to expand the Yup'ik Atlas.
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Indigenous Foods Knowledges Network (IFKN) third meeting

From June 17 to 20, members of the Indigenous Foods Knowledges Network (IFKN) joined families and children from Chickaloon Village, Alaska, the first time the community has welcomed a group of visitors to join them for the camp.
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Utqiaġvik visit

In mid-April, ELOKA scientist Matthew Druckenmiller visited Utqiaġvik, Alaska, to continue a 12-year mapping project of sea ice thickness along the community's annual network of ice trails, which are used for their spring bowhead whale hunt.
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