News and Events

June 2019

Chickaloon Village
The Indigenous Foods Knowledges Network (IFKN) meeting will start at Chickaloon Village in Alaska. Photo CC license by Cecil Sanders | High-resolution image

EVENT

Sunday, June 16, 2019 to Friday, June 21, 2019
The Indigenous Foods Knowledges Network (IFKN) will hold its third network meeting in Nay'dini'aa Na' Kayax' (Chickaloon Village), hosted by the Chickaloon Village Traditional Council. Attendees will finish the week in Anchorage with a visit to the Anchorage Museum, meeting with curators and discussing the role of heritage and contemporary art museums in food sovereignty. A public networking meeting with Indigenous organizations and others working on food sovereignty initiatives in Alaska will take place Friday, June 21. The Native Movement and Alaska Community Action on Toxics (ACAT) will host that meeting. To participate, please contact Noor Johnson.

May 2019

Iceberg photo from Arctic Report Card site
The Arctic Report Card monitors one of Earth's fastest-warming places. Credit: Arctic Report Card

NEWS

In early May, Matthew Druckenmiller attended a two-day workshop at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) in Seattle, Washington, to participate in a coordination and planning workshop for the NOAA Arctic Report Card (ARC). The ARC has been published annually since 2006 to serve as a peer-reviewed source for timely and concise environmental information on the current state of the Arctic environmental system. Matthew recently joined the ARC editorial team in January 2019.

EVENT

Wednesday, May 22, 2019 to Thursday, May 30, 2019
ELOKA researcher Matt Druckenmiller visited Arkhangelsk, Russia, for the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC) Meeting and Arctic Science Summit Week (ASSW). The meeting theme is "Climate Change and Human Development in the Arctic."

April 2019

Utqiagvik coast
NSIDC's Matt Druckenmiller collaborated with colleagues at AAOKH and the North Slope Bureau to produce ice-trail maps such as these. Credit: Matt Druckenmiller | High-resolution image

NEWS

In mid-April, ELOKA scientist Matthew Druckenmiller visited Utqiaġvik, Alaska, to continue a 12-year mapping project of sea ice thickness along the community's annual network of ice trails, which are used for their spring bowhead whale hunt. As part of this project, which is now supported by the Alaska Arctic Observatory and Knowledge Hub (AAOKH), Druckenmiller and colleague Josh Jones of the AAOKH project traveled the ice trails by snowmachine, mapping locations with GPS, and measuring ice thickness with an electromagnetic (EM) conductivity meter mounted in a long plastic sled. Trail maps, such as this one from late April, are provided to the whalers and the local search and rescue office to inform the community on ice conditions and hunting crew trail locations. 

March 2019

Himdag Ki: Way of Life House cultural center and museum is where part of the IFKN meeting will be held. Credit: Deanna Garcia | High-resolution image

EVENT

On March 12 to 15, 2019, the Indigenous Foods Knowledges Network (IFKN) held its second network meeting on Tohono O’odham Nation lands, including the University of Arizona. The IFKN steering committee chose the theme of “Indigenous Knowledge” for this gathering. Amy Juan of the International Indian Treaty Council and Sustainable Nations, an organization dedicated to sustainable community building, hosted the meeting. ELOKA co-lead Noor Johnson, principal investigator for the IFKN project, co-organized and attended the meeting. 

The meeting was held at the Himdag Ki: Way of Life House cultural center and museum at the University of Arizona, with site visits to a number of local organizations. More than 25 Indigenous participants, including five from Alaska, participated in the meeting to learn about community efforts at Tohono O’odham to reintroduce sustainable farming practices and traditional crops and to build climate resiliency.

Details and outcomes

Dr. Selso Villegas, director of water resources for Tohono O’odham, spoke about the interconnection between water and food security and emphasized the need for mitigation and adaptation action to address climate change. On the Tohono O’odham Community Action farm, Jesse Garcia and Gilbert Villegas, Jr., showed participants the crops they are growing using berm irrigation techniques. At the San Xavier Co-Operative Farm on the outskirts of Tucson, farm employees described the work that has been done over several decades to develop farming skills and knowledge in the younger generation, and participants enjoyed a meal featuring traditional foods including tepary beans, squash, and cactus buds. Participants identified areas of common interest for further work, including working to identify innovative ways of sharing food knowledge, such as through digital storytelling. At the end of the meeting, Kari Shaginoff and Shawna Larsen from Chickaloon Village, Alaska, invited the network to join them for their annual Nay’dini’aa Na’Kayax culture camp in June 2019.

The Indigenous Foods Knowledges Network is a four-year, NSF-funded research coordination network focusing on food, knowledge, and data sovereignty in the US Southwest and the Arctic. Indigenous communities serve as hosts, helping organize the meetings and engaging local harvesters, farmers, Indigenous knowledge holders, and community leaders. At each meeting, participants spend time visiting projects and connecting with the land and with one another. The meetings, held once or twice a year, alternate between Southwest and Arctic locations. One of the goals of this network is to build a community of scholars and community leaders to learn about shared challenges and community-driven solutions to building resiliency in the context of environmental change.

A farmer at Tohono O'odham Community Action stands among the pea plants.
Gilbert Villegas, Jr., a farmer at Tohono O'odham Community Action, stands among the pea plants that are nearly ready for harvest. The plants are cultivated using traditional irrigation methods. Credit: Noor Johnson | High-resolution image
A co-op worker gives a tour of the vegetable fields at San Xavier Cooperative Farm.
A co-op worker gives a tour of the vegetable fields at San Xavier Cooperative Farm on the Tohono O'odham Nation in Tucson, Arizona. Credit: Noor Johnson | High-resolution image

Dinner served at San Xavier Cooperative Farm in Tucson features tepary bean soup and choya bud relish.
Dinner served at San Xavier Cooperative Farm in Tucson features tepary bean soup and choya bud relish. Credit: Noor Johnson | High-resolution iamge
Jesse Garcia from Tohono O'odham Community Action orientes IFKN visitors to landscape features on the farm.
Jesse Garcia from Tohono O'odham Community Action orientes IFKN visitors to landscape features on the farm. Credit: Noor Johnson | High-resolution image

Water pools in a field at Tohono O'odham Community Action farm, where berms are used to hold water for irrigation. Credit: Noor Johnson | High-resolution image
Our host and IFKN Steering Committee member Amy Juan welcomes the group to Tohono O'odham Community Action farm.
Our host and IFKN Steering Committee member Amy Juan welcomes the group to Tohono O'odham Community Action farm. Credit: Noor Johnson | High-resolution image

February 2019

Firewood is being prepared in a spring Evenki camp within the taiga forest.
Firewood is being prepared in a spring Evenki camp within the taiga forest. Credit: SnowChange|High-resolution image

FEATURE ARTICLE

A living atlas comes to life

ELOKA partnered with SnowChange Cooperative to create the cyberinfrastructure for the first online cultural atlas of Indigenous Knowledge from Siberia. Read more...

Pew Trust photo of Shari Fox in the field
Shari Fox's research involves spending time on the ice with hunters and elders. Credit: Pew Trust

NEWS

ELOKA scientist Shari Fox has been named a Pew fellow in marine conservation in 2019. Fox is one of eight fellowship recipients chosen from around the world. Each fellow receives $150,000 for a three-year project related to ocean conservation. Fox's fellowship relates to Pikialasorsuaq (North Water Polynya). Each spring, this polynya forms between Canada and Greenland. Plankton blooms in this polynya are the basis for the food chain of marine species and the Inuit communities that rely on those species. Climate change and growing industrial activities both encroach upon this polynya.

Fox will work with Inuit communities to better understand Pikialasorsuaq and how to manage it in the future. 


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Last Updated: 
Fri, 06/14/2019