INTAROS Community-based Monitoring Experience Exchange Workshop

Johnson, N., M. Fidel, F. Danielsen, L. Iversen, M. K. Poulsen, D. Hauser, and P. Pulsifer. 2018. INTAROS Community-based Monitoring Experience Exchange Workshop Report: Canada. Workshop organized as a contribution to INTAROS, December 11-12, 2017. Exchange for Local Observations and Knowledge of the Arctic (ELOKA), Nordic Foundation for Development and Ecology (NORDECO), Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC), International Arctic Research Center (IARC) at University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), and Integrated Arctic Observation System (INTAROS). Québec City, Québec. (27 pg.)


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INTAROS Community-based Monitoring Experience Exchange Workshop Report

Fidel, M., N. Johnson, F. Danielsen, H. Eicken, L. Iversen, O. Lee, and C. Strawhacker. 2017. INTAROS Community-based Monitoring Experience Exchange Workshop Report. Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council (YRITWC), University of Alaska Fairbanks, ELOKA, and INTAROS: Fairbanks.


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Community-based Monitoring and Indigenous Knowledge in a Changing Arctic Report

Johnson, N., C. Behe, F. Danielsen, E.-M. Krümmel, S. Nickels, and P. Pulsifer. 2016. Community-based Monitoring and Indigenous Knowledge in a Changing Arctic: A Review of the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks. Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC), Brown University, the Exchange for Local Knowledge and Observations of the Arctic (ELOKA), and Inuit Qaujisarvingat: Inuit Knowledge Centre of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK). Ottawa, Ontario. (62 pg.)


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Greenlandic Perspectives on Climate Change 2018 to 2019

The Greenlandic Perspectives on Climate Change Survey report provides the first national estimates of residents’ climate change beliefs, experiences, risk-opportunity perceptions and emotional responses, as well as views on recent sea ice changes, glacial changes, climate change impacts, societal adaptation, and climate and environment policy preferences. 

From July 2018 to January 2019, an international team of Greenlandic, American, Swedish and Danish researchers from the University of Greenland, University of Copenhagen, Greenland Perspective and Kraks Fond Institute for Urban Research conducted the first Greenlandic Perspectives Survey (GPS), a nationally representative survey of Greenlandic residents’ views about environmental changes and Greenland’s future. In partnership with Statistics Greenland, surveys were randomly allocated to residents living in randomly selected towns and settlements across Greenland’s municipalities and geographic regions, as well as the self-representing locations of Nuuk and Upernavik. 646 residents in Greenland (~1.5 percent of the adult population) took the survey from July 2018 to January 2019. The margin of error is +/- 3 percent at the 95 percent confidence level. Additionally, filmed interviews were conducted in each location.

Greenlandic Perspectives on Climate Change: Two Short Films
Language: Greenlandic (and a little Danish)
Subtitle Options: Danish OR English

Film 1: (6:14)
Danish Subtitles 
English Subtitles 

Film 2: (5:24)
Danish Subtitles 
English Subtitles 

 


Traditional Knowledge Reports on Marine Mammals

These reports, compiled from a series of related projects, are based on interviews held between 2007 and 2017 with Alaska Native hunters in coastal communities. The reports focus on marine mammals, with emphasis on changes in particular species during the decade of the conducted interviews. This collection is unusual in that it spans both a decade and a large geographic range of communities. The reports, as well as the results of the projects, were also presented in two peer-reviewed papers in scientific journals:

Huntington, H.P., L.T. Quakenbush, and M. Nelson. 2017. Evaluating the effects of climate change on Indigenous marine mammal hunting in northern and western Alaska using traditional knowledge. Frontiers in Marine Science 4:319. doi:10.3389/fmars.2017.00319.

Huntington, H.P., L.T. Quakenbush, and M. Nelson. 2016. Effects of changing sea ice on marine mammals and subsistence hunters in northern Alaska from traditional knowledge interviews. Biology Letters 12: 20160198. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2016.0198.


Community-Based Environmental and Species Observations from the Bering Sea Sub-Network

The Bering Sea Sub-Network (BSSN) is comprised of a set of coastal communities representing six indigenous cultures: three in the Russian Federation and three in the United States. The objective of BSSN is to develop a framework that will enable residents in remote Arctic communities to systematically document physical and social changes occurring in their region. In 2008 and 2009, approximately 300 hunters and fishermen participated a pilot project of harvest surveys covering species caught, species health, and intended use; changing climate and environmental conditions; location and travel information; and a review of harvest conditions.

For more information and to download the summary report, see the NSIDC page for Summary Report of Community-Based Environmental and Species Observations from the Bering Sea Sub-Network, 2008-2009. To submit a request for access to the restricted survey data, see the NSIDC page for Survey Data of Community-Based Environmental and Species Observations from the Bering Sea Sub-Network, 2008-2009.